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Top 10 creative jobs: continued

Top 10 creative jobs: continued6: Photographer

Professional photographers take photographic images for a wide range of purposes, from family portraits, fashion, food, and crime scenes, to medical and scientific records. They usually specialise in one area, such as newspapers, advertising, editorial, fashion, forensic, scientific, medical, or general practice.

What qualifications do I need?

There are no set qualifications for entry into this career but most photographers have completed a course in photography. Courses that offer industry contacts and work placements are particularly useful. There is a wide range of relevant courses available, including A-levels, City & Guilds qualifications and degrees.

How much does it pay?

Salaries for photographers may range from around £12,000 to £50,000 or more a year.

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7: Choreographer

Choreographers create dance or movement routines for a variety of productions, including ballet, musical theatre, film, television, music videos, ice dance and fashion shows, or corporate events. They may have complete creative control or work closely with a director, contributing ideas and interpreting instructions.

What qualifications do I need?

Choreographers are almost always trained dancers. Most dancers start training at a very early age and often take graded examinations before going on to vocational training or higher education. There is a wide range of dance qualifications available, including GCSE and A-level dance, BTEC National Certificates and diplomas, degrees and postgraduate qualifications.

How much does it pay?

Some choreographers are employed by major companies, but most are freelance or employed on short-term contracts. They negotiate a fee which depends on experience, location and the available budget. Choreographers in the theatre earn a minimum of £130 a day. Well-known choreographers can earn £40,000 a year or more.

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8: TV/Film producer

Producers are at the heart of creating films and TV productions. They bring together the creative team and have ultimate responsibility for the production.

What qualifications do I need?

There are no set qualifications, though many producers have a foundation degree, an honours degree or a Higher National Diploma/Certificate (HND/HNC). They move into producing through a variety of routes. TV drama producers may start off working in the theatre and progress via script reading to production. Some current affairs producers start as journalists or TV researchers. Another common route into the TV or film industry is to start as a runner, which offers the chance to make contacts and experience all aspects of the business.

How much does it pay?

Salaries may range from £15,000 to over £75,000 for the top producers.

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9: Writer

Writers produce works of fiction and non-fiction. They may work on novels, short stories, poetry, scripts for radio, TV, film or theatre, non-fiction books, newspaper and magazine articles or website content.

What qualifications do I need?

There is no set entry route. While a high standard of English is essential, academic qualifications are generally less important than flair, originality and experience. To develop as a writer it is often considered necessary to read and write a great deal. Many writers have a degree. This may be in a relevant subject, such as English literature, creative writing, journalism or performing arts, or in an unrelated topic. Obtaining early experience, such as contributing articles to a student newspaper, writing radio features or joining a writers' group, can be useful.

How much does it pay?

Income varies enormously. While some writing projects can be lucrative, it can take time to become established enough to be able to earn a full-time income. Those with a strong reputation and track record typically command higher fees. Prose fiction and non-fiction writers negotiate their own fees with publishers, usually through their agent. The Writers' Guild negotiates minimum rates for TV, radio, film and some theatre.

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10: Art exhibition organiser

Art exhibition organisers plan, mount and maintain displays in galleries or museums. They combine their appreciation of art with project management skills, to create interesting and engaging events to attract the widest possible audience.

What qualifications do I need?

Art exhibition organisers may need a degree, usually in a relevant subject such as fine art, art history or archaeology. Some also have a professional postgraduate qualification. This may be studied part time during employment.

How much does it pay?

Salaries may start from around £12,000, rising to around £60,000 or more a year for heads of art exhibitions in national galleries.

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